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  1. #1
    Grumpy Ol' Sod

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    Default OSI 7 Layer Model vs TCP/IP Model.

    Hey guys, I was wondering if anyone could help with this.

    I'm in college as part of an apprenticeship in telcomms, and I've been given this question on an assignment, and don't have a clue where to start.

    Basically the question says "Critically compare the OSI 7 Layer Model with the TCP/IP Model.". I know how both are constructed (We've been taught the TCP/IP Model with 5 layers, but I'm aware that different people use different layers), and I have a fair grasp on how each of them work, and understand which protocols work where.

    I just wanted to know if anyone could help me write anything in regards to this question?

    Thanks for any help.
    xreyuk

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  2. #2
    Logan
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    The TCP/IP Model is often represented as 4 layers - not 5 - although there is some disagreement depending on the source. Certainly in Cisco and RFC terms it's 4 layers - Network Access, Internet, Transport and Application (exact wording can vary)

    In OSI terms, the Physical and Data link layers are represented in the TCP/IP model as the Network Access Layer (But are sometimes separated)

    The Application, Presentation and Session Layers are essentially encapsulated into the Application Layer in TCP/IP model terms.

    Transport and Network layers remain the same.

    This is indeed a very brief overview...and not to sound funny but you will get all the info you need with google searches

    Oh and this is in a very VERY wrong section

  3. #3
    Grumpy Ol' Sod

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    Thanks, i had no idea where to post this. But its not how they are constructed, i need to critically compare them. So i need to say what is wrong with one, compared to the other, which in my opinion is a bit of stupid question. I've tried google searching for about 3 hours today alone, and no where will tell me any downfalls or faults with either of them, let alone against each other.

    Thanks for the post though.

    If this is in the wrong section, could a mod please move it to the appropriate section

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  4. #4
    Logan
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    Quote Originally Posted by xreyuk View Post
    Thanks, i had no idea where to post this. But its not how they are constructed i need to critically compare. So i need to say what is wrong with one, compared to the other, which in my opinion is a bit of stupid question.
    Re-reading your question makes me realise I didn't really read it properly. I thought you were asking something entirely different!

    I agree it's a bit of a **** question but such is the nature of education.

    Google still has the answers. If it's critical analysis they are after then you need to think for yourself and get some quality references.

    Perhaps something about the OSI level having a more broken down approach...I duno really. Not something I ever need to think about at work

  5. #5
    Grumpy Ol' Sod

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    Lol no worries mate. Education is a bit stupid, but usually they teach what is wrong and right about something. In this case they only told us what they do. It's impossible to really find a fault (on what we have been taught.)

    Thanks for your help, and i'm glad you don't have to think about it at work!

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  6. #6
    Logan
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    Lol, well sorry to have not been more of a help.

    I've been there with the whole critical analysis thing though. Awful stuff.

    Good luck!

  7. #7
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    I recently had to do this before Christmas, I will see if I can find the main resouce I used as most of it was useful so might be for you too.

  8. #8
    Grumpy Ol' Sod

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    Quote Originally Posted by looney View Post
    You can just write about the characteristics of each model, similarities and differences, pros and cons. Infomation on those should be widely available.

    For example(taken from cisco slides):

    Similarities of the OSI and TCP/IP Models

    - Both have layers.
    - Both have application layers, though they include very different services.
    - Both have comparable transport and network layers.
    - Both are Packet-switched, not circuit-switched.
    - Networking professionals need to know both models.

    Differences of the OSI and TCP/IP Models

    - TCP/IP combines the presentation and session layer into its application layer.
    - TCP/IP combines the OSI data link and physical layers into one layer.
    - TCP/IP appears simpler because it has fewer layers.
    - TCP/IP transport layer using UDP does not always guarantee reliable delivery of packets as the transport layer in the OSI model does.
    + rep

    Thanks for that, but i've not been able to find any pro's or cons on either model. I don't know whether it's what I'm searching for or just there is nothing out there. Are there any pro's and cons you believe of?

    You also said that they include very different services in the application layer, do you mean talk about how the TCP/IP application layer effectively does what the first 3 layers of the OSI model do?

    Finally just to clarify, does the OSI model NOT use UDP in the transport layer? And does it use TCP in the transport layer?

    Thanks for the information, that should come in handy.

    @Garsty - That would be brilliant. As i've said, i've been hard pressed to find pros and cons on either, but it might just be what i'm searching.
    Last edited by xreyuk; 20th January 2010 at 05:03 PM.

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  9. #9
    My Username Lies

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    shrek taught me that onions have layers

    also when I plug an ethernet cable into such an equipped device, it just works. thanks networking guyz, you're the best!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garsty View Post
    I recently had to do this before Christmas, I will see if I can find the main resouce I used as most of it was useful so might be for you too.
    Here it is, its not brilliant but I got some info out of it.

    www.revisecomputing.co.uk/h_revision/resources/h_cn_osi.ppt

  11. #11
    Grumpy Ol' Sod

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garsty View Post
    Here it is, its not brilliant but I got some info out of it.

    www.revisecomputing.co.uk/h_revision/resources/h_cn_osi.ppt
    + Rep

    Thanks mate.

    If anyones got any more input that'd be brilliant!

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  12. #12
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    Default

    it depends on what you need to know really, there is so much info i can give to you, but i dont want to just start pasting random things in
    my rig: CM690; P5W DH; E4300 ; 2Gig corsair 667; Igreen 600W; Seagate 320; asus 4670; 1 DVD-RW; artic pro 7 vista premium

  13. #13
    Grumpy Ol' Sod

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    All i was told was i need to critically compare between the two. So what is bad with one, and why does that make the other better?

    For instance, i spoke to my uncle today and he told me that applications in TCP/IP model have to be more complex because they manage their own retrys, sequencing etc (using FTP as an example), so it is in the network layer.

    However, in the OSI model it is just an application, as the rest of the model will manage sequencing, retrys and error checking.

    This is a disadvantage for the TCP/IP model because it means the applications have to be more complex. However, it's an advantage because it usually means performance is better.

    In short terms, why is one better at something than the other, or just why is one better than the other. Obviously i need positives and negatives for both sides.

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  14. #14
    Logan
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    Whoever moved this thread here needs to do some homework

 

 

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